Out with the old, in with the…on second thought…

January 4, 2013 § 14 Comments

2013 rushed in, rudely sweeping aside 2012, who had just only gotten going. “Out with the old, in with the new!” she shouted.

“Old? I just turned one!” said poor 2012. “I was just getting going! I was on track to be the best year ever!”

“Beat it,” retorted 2013. “You’re the jackass who brought us the fiscal cliff, hurricanes in New York City, mass murderers in schools and theaters, apocalypse in Syria, complete melting of the polar winter ice, destabilization of the Antarctic ice shelf, crop failure in the Midwest, and the hottest summer ever recorded. You had your shot at glory and you blew it. Now step aside.”

With that, and copious amounts of tequila, the world’s revelers plunged madly into 2013, where, on the first day of the year, although things didn’t look exactly “new,” they sure looked foggy, dull, and shot with pain from the blinding hangover.

“Don’t worry about the over indulging in bad food, the excessive drink, and screwing your best friend’s wife on the last night of 2012,” reassured 2013. “We’ve got a fix for all that. It’s called the ‘New Year’s Resolution.’ You can fix all your problems and guarantee perfection in 2013 with it! Buy now and you’ll get this special SlicerDicer with a compact ratchet set and skin moisturizer all in one!”

Making 2013 the perfect year

Of course 2013 will be just as cobbled together, filled with disappointment, shot with joy and happiness, complicated, simple, profitable, and stained with red ink as 2012. The only difference is that by the end, everyone over the age of 28 will be one year dumber, one year weaker, and one year uglier. And EVERYONE will be one year older. So there’s that, as Knoll would say.

“No!” shouted 2013. “With resolutions we can fix the errors of the past! Let’s get started!”

A notepad and pencil were hastily shoved in front of the post-revelers, whose headaches had gotten so bad that, after puking three times they were too dehydrated to go back to sleep. Plus, the dog needed to be fed and had already crapped twice on the carpet. “Argh,” said the revelers. “Might as well resolve.”

So the Big Four marched out, the same Big Four that march out every year. The Big Four resolutions that enter the new year with so much force and fury that McDonald’s and Big Tobacco and Big Alcohol recoil, and employers everywhere rejoice. You know who I’m talking about:

Mr. I’m Gonna Lose Ten Pounds And Exercise Regularly.

And Mr. I’m Gonna Quit Smoking And Doing Drugs.

And Mr. I’m Gonna Quit Drinking.

And Mr. I’m Gonna Get Organized And Quit Putting Stuff Off.

Cyclists, of course, always add Mr. I’m Gonna Become A Better Climber.

“Yeah,” say the painfully hungover revelers. “I’m gonna do all that shit, but first I gotta have a cig and a beer after I finish the cake and eggnog leftovers from last night. And since I’m sick as shit today, I’ll get started on it tomorrow. Where’s the Advil?”

Some old things never change, Thank Dog

In the crazy rush to get rid of all the things that make us happy, though, one ancient, time-encrusted, hoary old tradition stands tall against the battering waves of change: Dave Jaeger’s French Toast Ride.

It’s now in its 15th or 500th year, depending on how aged and decrepit Jim Bowles, Martin Howard, and Gregg Stern look on the day of the ride, but numbers aside, it’s a lot older than the sum of its years. The FTR, like all old things, and especially like all old cyclists, is a perversely constructed event that has adapted and survived because of its perverse construction.

It’s not a race. It’s not a ride. It’s not an event, either. It’s more like scratching your butt–a nice habit that’s a bit socially awkward but that feels so good once you start that it’s almost impossible to start.

The FTR covers 118 miles of roads in and around Camarillo, Ojai, and Ventura. It has a couple of hard climbs, with the Balcom Canyon stinger thrown in at about mile one hundred. Strava it, or Google it, or search this blog for write-ups on past years and you’ll see what a miserable climb it is, and you’ll learn more than you ever wanted to know about the route and its various obstacles, not to mention the travails of the riders.

Since the participants are all quite aged, with only one rider in his twenties, one in his thirties, the rest being far over forty, and a handful just a decade or two shy of the Jurassic, the ride doesn’t race, exactly. The balance of riders are too weak and old for that.

There are, however, a couple of KOM’s, a couple of regroup points, and everyone finishes together on a miserable little pitch up the backside of a golf course leading into Camarillo. Weather is mandated to be perfect, and it always is.

A tribute to the enablers of 2012

What the FTR really is, is a tribute to the cycling enablers among us. They’re the people who watch us roll out in the morning, fully aware that we may come back via LifeFlight, or we may come back so injured that we’re never the same again, or we may never come back at all.

They’re the people who don’t fully understand but nonetheless approve the purchase of not one, but two extra sets of full carbon race wheels. They’re the people who don’t share our passion for cycling, but who love us because of our in spite of our passion. They’re the ones who don’t ask why, even though they occasionally grumble about having to give hand-ups in the hot, or the cold, or the snow, or the rain.

FTR couldn’t take place without enablers, and not just ordinary enablers. Jim and Nancy Jaeger, the hosts, open their home to invasion by thirty or so ravenously hungry, highly excitable, and digestively dynamic cyclists.You might not think that’s such a big deal until you realize that each one of those cyclists, after scarfing the French toast breakfast, immediately dashes upstairs with massive rumblings of the large intestines.

No one will ever forget the year that Stern-O’s release and subsequent OCD tissue-wiping of the entire bathroom clogged the toilet, burst pipes inside the walls, and required a hazmat crew to come in and clean up the destruction. But what I will never forget is despite that incident and the general bomb-dropping and log burials that accompany the FTR every year, the Jaegers graciously make their home available again. Enablers? Yes. Saints? Most likely.

Lynn, Macy, and Carly Jaeger put together an assembly line of French toast, bacon, sausage, and strong coffee that would shame any military operation. They chalk the sidewalk, or at least the driveway, with cheerful slogans like “You guys all suck!” and “Good luck, wankers!” Mostly, though, they provide the infrastructure of food, good cheer, and assistance that makes every little nattering glitch dissolve so that the ride rolls out on time.

Who’s your enabler?

The FTR’s enablers come together for this one day each year to allow us the dual pleasures of wasting another entire day on the bike and getting to do it fully supported with food before and after the ride. If need be, and need has occasionally been, Jim Jaeger is never too far away to drive out to some point in the ride and scrape up a hapless wanker who’s found himself mechanically, physically, or emotionally unable to continue.

In 2013 you’ll be rolling the highways, or the dirt tracks, or race courses that have been set up for your cycling pleasure. Someone’s making it all possible for you, or at least not throwing up roadblocks, unless it’s Dorothy Wong and you’re racing ‘cross. In all likelihood, no matter what your enablers say, they admire you for not needing a New Year’s resolution to go out and push your body and your mind in this most physical of ways. At the very least, they admire your courage in wearing lycra despite that saggy gut.

I’m not so sure that global warming, or psychotic gun nuts, or war in the Middle East, or the surveillance state, or political gridlock will markedly improve in 2013. But I’m sure that the FTR and its enablers, as well as all the enablers who make your cycling possible, need to stick around, not just for this year, but forever.

In that one little way, at least, here’s hoping that 2012 is here to stay.

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§ 14 Responses to Out with the old, in with the…on second thought…

  • Dan says:

    My resolution for 2013 is that i will shamelessly plagiarize the term “dick stomping” and use it as much as possible. Thank you for making my vernacular more colorful

  • A-Trav says:

    I’m pretty sure my enablers just want to get me out of the house.

  • dan martin says:

    Thanks WM…good read to start my day.

  • KH says:

    Guilty as charged. Dang it. I hate it when another Wanker hits the nail on the head.

  • Mike says:

    But, but, but…I really am going to become a better climber this year. Fuck you, Wanky, for saying otherwise! I am, I am going to do it because I’m gonna get real organized-like and have a slacktacular training plan where I’ll be forced to lose that last 15 pounds. Of course, my jammin’-slammin’ new diet will help out too. I mean, seriously, if I can also stop taking all those (prescription) drugs that I keep on the kitchen counter for easy access I just might stay off the fuckin’ couch long enough to go ride. And, dog-dammit, I really, really, honestly, really am going to stop drinking…for most of the year anyway….’til 4th of July…or Lent…maybe Valentine’s to make the Missus happy…fuck, I’ll try for the rest of the week.

    Damn you for doubting me, Wanky, I’m fucking awesome!

    • Admin says:

      You are awesome! And you’ve enriched my vocabulary with the so-far-best-word of 2013…slacktacular!

      • Mike says:

        I’d be nothing without your inspiration, Seth. I was pretty sure you’d get a kick out of ‘slacktacular’, you’re more than welcome!

  • ohmannuel says:

    Thank you for this.

  • mike g. says:

    Wanky, just got home from Steve’ s mem. ride. What a great turn out on such a beautiful day, Steve would have been very happy. Thank you for taking the helm & keeping all the wankers in check. Mike G.

    • Admin says:

      Thanks so much for the note and for being one of the folks who took a beautiful, sunny morning to dedicate to a great friend and greater humanitarian.

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